“In the life of this state, there is no single event that comes anywhere close to matching the importance to all mankind of what took place at Kitty Hawk on Dec. 17, 1903.”As described in this quote Kitty Hawk supported something so amazing that nothing could come anywhere close to matching the importance of it. As you all may know, this date and place are the exact time and location that Orville and Wilbur Wright are believed to be thefirst men to achieve stable powered flight. But it says that no event could ever come close to matching the importance of it… But I say there is. An extraordinary man, who went by the name of Gustave Whitehead, achieved this goal an amazing 2 years before Orville and Wilbur's flight. Buckle your seatbelts; we're about to lift off into a new scene of history all about the real beginning of flight.
Gustave Whitehead, born Gustav Weisskoph on January 1, of 1874,first became interested in flying when he was younger. Gustave would watch birds in an attempt to learn how they flew. He would use this technique later in his life to build many of his bird-like airplanes.
Gustave Weisskoph moved to the U.S. in 1895, when he was 21, and changed his name to Whitehead immediately after his move. Whitehead started pursuing his dream of flight the same year he arrived in America. Whitehead constructed a flapping-wing glider. This glider was unsuccessful in flying. But that didn't hinder Whiteheads desire to fly. Next, in 1896 Whitehead was hired by E. I. Horsman to build kites and Lilienthal-type gliders, which Horsman sold at his large toy store. These small jobs started Whitehead high in the sky for his flying career. Working on kites and gliders only increased his determination to fly even more.
After building kites and gliders, he quit his job and started building airplanes. Very few of Whitehead's airplanes had reported success in flying. However in 1901, Whitehead recorded h