The United States at the Paris Peace Conference
The First World War had lasting effects on almost every aspect of our society.Empires and monarchies collapsed, democracy began to rise, capitalism was affected, and inflation resulted from the cost of war.It became apparent that an agreement must be reached which would clearly outline the steps necessary to repair the damages done by the war.Even more importantly, a method must be devised which would, in theory, prevent such a horrific war from occurring ever again.The Paris Peace Conference was held in the winter of 1919, predominantly at the infamous Palace of Versailles, and was intended to realize these goals.
Twenty-seven nations were present at the Conference, although only four of these countries had a true voice in the matter at hand.These four countries, the Great Powers, were Italy, France, England, and the United States.Represented by Vittorio Orlando, Georges Clemenceau, David Lloyd George, and Woodrow Wilson, respectively, these men held the vast majority of power and influence present at the Conference.President Wilson represented the United States at Versailles.He believed that World War I should end in a treaty based on democracy rather than on politics of power, and he was present to see to it that the Treaty of Versailles was written accordingly.Wilson embodied the success of the democratic, liberal, progressive and nationalistic movements of the past century, and represented what society wished for the future.
His idealistic views and goals for the reparation of society were made evident through his presence at the Conference, as well as
through the plans that he brought with him.In a talk with newspaperman R.J. Bender of the United Press, Wilson states what is basically his attitude towards the entire conference:"A statement that I once made that this should be a peace without victory holds more strongly today than ever.The …