The Origins, Perspectives and Conseqeunces of Reconstruction Laws
The period following the American Civil War was plagued with racial violence, political and social turmoil as well as a great sense of divisiveness.The period of Congressional Reconstruction was an immensely significant chapter in the legal history of the south and the United States as a whole.In less than a decade the entire perception of the American system of government took an enormous shift towards that of federalism.These laws took the form in the period of Reconstruction of all three theoretical forms of legal evolution, Law and Custom, Structuralist and Conflict.An examination of all three perspectives
The Law and Custom Theory states that law originates from the custom of society and customary practice.However the Enforcement Act as well as the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the Constitution prohibited an ingrained custom in Southern antebellum society, which was slavery.If we were to make the argument that law is a product of social custom why did so many reconstruction laws renounce a southern custom?It was in fact custom in the South for all blacks to remain subordinate to whites.In fact all over the country, prior, during and following the Civil War blacks were held in a very inferior social caste in the American social structure.It was post-Civil War Reconstruction legislation that attempted to change this, against the will of a large portion of the American populous.
Law and Custom Theory also implies that to a certain extent law reflects popular will, the will of society and culture.However in response to Congressional Reconstruction laws, protests, many violent occurred all across the South and even some instances in the North.The laws and Constitutional Amendments that lead to the Reese and Cruikshank cases were not derived from custom; they were designed, written and enforced for the purpose of abolishin…

The south can be defined in many ways depending on the person's feelings
toward it and that of which they have experienced. To me the south has to be the best
place to live in all the United States.
One of the things that stick out in my head about my beloved birthplace that will
never be forgotten, because they're held so dear to my heart, are the smiling faces that
you see everywhere you look.I'm telling you; people here are so nice that you would be
lucky to find someone rude towards you within a week's period.That can only be best
described just as plain ole' southern hospitality. I mean the dialect of all the southerners
is so comforting, it just reassures you that your plenty welcome all the time.The thing
that gets me and always makes me appreciate the southerners' lingo is the great analogies
used by them.Seriously, For every situation you can think of there's got to be about five
southern phrases used to describe that very thing.
Another thing that defines the south is its culture.Where else can you find a
garage sell at every turn.I mean where else is there a state park that hosts a gathering of
country folk to sell all there junk to another southerner who in turn will be right back at
that same place with a stand of their own trying to get rid of the dang thing they bought
just a few weeks ago.The funny thing is, if you ever decided to take a drive through the
south, you would probably mistake some southerner's land as a yard sell or junkyard for
that matter.Most southerners aren't surprised when they see they're friends yard covered
with old tires, rusty cars, broken chairs, and all of these things just swallowed in 3 foot of
grass that hasn't been cut since little Bo wrecked the tractor used to bush hog the thick
stuff.I mean there's just no telling what you might find in that …

The south can be defined in many ways depending on the person's feelings
toward it and that of which they have experienced. To me the south has to be the best
place to live in all the United States.
One of the things that stick out in my head about my beloved birthplace that will
never be forgotten, because they're held so dear to my heart, are the smiling faces that
you see everywhere you look.I'm telling you; people here are so nice that you would be
lucky to find someone rude towards you within a week's period.That can only be best
described just as plain ole' southern hospitality. I mean the dialect of all the southerners
is so comforting, it just reassures you that your plenty welcome all the time.The thing
that gets me and always makes me appreciate the southerners' lingo is the great analogies
used by them.Seriously, For every situation you can think of there's got to be about five
southern phrases used to describe that very thing.
Another thing that defines the south is its culture.Where else can you find a
garage sell at every turn.I mean where else is there a state park that hosts a gathering of
country folk to sell all there junk to another southerner who in turn will be right back at
that same place with a stand of their own trying to get rid of the dang thing they bought
just a few weeks ago.The funny thing is, if you ever decided to take a drive through the
south, you would probably mistake some southerner's land as a yard sell or junkyard for
that matter.Most southerners aren't surprised when they see they're friends yard covered
with old tires, rusty cars, broken chairs, and all of these things just swallowed in 3 foot of
grass that hasn't been cut since little Bo wrecked the tractor used to bush hog the thick
stuff.I mean there's just no telling what you might find in that …