Though television and the media in general have an adverse effect on individuals, the news, with its reputation founded on newly constructed museums and monuments congratulating itself and the entire Vietnam war behind it, is unquestionably the most potentially dangerous medium.As described in the article “Parachute Journalism” by S. Wizda, news media has not only the power, but also the means and the drive to reinforce both simplicity and passivity of thought in regard to television, politics, and perhaps life as a whole.
Propaganda is a very dangerous thing, and this article is quite eloquent in its retelling of the Timothy MacVeigh saga.Being a perfect example (much like the Columbine story), Gun Town, Kansas provides convenient fodder for the propaganda machine.However, the article was not without its shortcomings.
Like several critical arguments, Wizda succeeds very quickly at identifying a problem, while failing at presenting a solution.If the populace is so unable to realize the problem, then perhaps their brains have been muddled by television beyond the point of retribution, and finding a solution to the problem is beyond the necessity of any argument.However, a problem is hollow without at least the suggestion of a solution.In considering the idea of propaganda, a more in-depth examination, considered with more
understanding and less eagerness to mudsling, would more than likely create a plausible situation that could be improved upon.
For example, creating in Kansas the idea of a simple, ignorant, gun-wielding town reflects the idea that broadcast companies are both short on time and desperate for viewers when creating their by-lines.While this behavior is not desirable, it exists for real reasons, and without accepting those reasons, the problem cannot fizzle.People, even seemingly infallible media personalities, need to eat, and they need to feel that they do their job correctly.Because they perc…