Covenants and contracts are all around us-some serious, some not so serious. In the seventeenth century, a particular group of colonists, the Puritans, made covenants a part of their daily living. They took the voyage to the "New World" as a way of escaping religious intolerance, with the hope of establishing a sacred, God-fearing community.
A covenant was necessary in almost every facet of life- social, economical, and theological."A central element in Puritan social and theological life was the notion of the covenant.All social relationships-between God and man, ministers and congregations, magistrates and members of the community, and men and their families-were envisioned in terms of a covenant or contract that rested on the covenant and mutual responsibilities (Davis and Mintz, 64)".The Puritans settled in Massachusetts.Their government was founded on a general consensus.All "freemen" in the colony elected the government officials.The Puritans wanted to make God the focus of their community.A society which rested on Christian ideals-from the poor to the rich, the weak to the strong.These colonists wanted to set a precedent.They were in a new country, formulating, their own plan for success.They were to be a "City upon a Hill; the eyes of all the people are on us (Davis and Mintz, 66)." Th!
is meaning that if they abided by the covenant with their Lord, God would make them an example for the world…. yet, by breaking the covenant, the entire colony would feel the wrath of God.In light of their extreme dedication to God and their respect of His laws, they did not want to have a "church-run state." The Puritans Puritans were advocates for the separation of church and state."Even though they believe that the primary purpose of government was to punish the breach of God's laws, few people were as committed as the Puritans to the separation of chur…

Covenants and contracts are all around us-some serious, some not so serious. In the seventeenth century, a particular group of colonists, the Puritans, made covenants a part of their daily living. They took the voyage to the "New World" as a way of escaping religious intolerance, with the hope of establishing a sacred, God-fearing community.
A covenant was necessary in almost every facet of life- social, economical, and theological."A central element in Puritan social and theological life was the notion of the covenant.All social relationships-between God and man, ministers and congregations, magistrates and members of the community, and men and their families-were envisioned in terms of a covenant or contract that rested on the covenant and mutual responsibilities (Davis and Mintz, 64)".The Puritans settled in Massachusetts.Their government was founded on a general consensus.All "freemen" in the colony elected the government officials.The Puritans wanted to make God the focus of their community.A society which rested on Christian ideals-from the poor to the rich, the weak to the strong.These colonists wanted to set a precedent.They were in a new country, formulating, their own plan for success.They were to be a "City upon a Hill; the eyes of all the people are on us (Davis and Mintz, 66)." Th!
is meaning that if they abided by the covenant with their Lord, God would make them an example for the world…. yet, by breaking the covenant, the entire colony would feel the wrath of God.In light of their extreme dedication to God and their respect of His laws, they did not want to have a "church-run state." The Puritans Puritans were advocates for the separation of church and state."Even though they believe that the primary purpose of government was to punish the breach of God's laws, few people were as committed as the Puritans to the separation of chur…