Literature creates a visual representation of the universal struggle that conquers the human race. Its themes help to improve the laws and regulations that operate our world, so as to benefit every single individual in a positive manner. Sometimes, our minds are too stubborn; as a result, we remain uncivilized and corrupt, even though literature attempts to improve our lives. The Jungle, for example, written by Upton Sinclair, exposes the abuse perpetuated by industries upon the American public. The book illustrates; the trade of tainted meat, workers abuse and corporation abuse on house-buyers. Even though the government created laws to demolish those struggles/abuses, with time, those evil practices diffused into our society, and become incurable. Eric Schlosser's, Fast Food Nation, reveals how the problems that were once solved by the Jungle, emerged back into the earth causing corruption and destruction in our society. This essay will analyze abuse of workers, sale of tainted eat, and corporation abuse on home-buyers based on how The Jungle diagnosed those problems, and Fast Food Nation's current struggle to terminate their emergence.
The Jungle, published in 1907, exposed to the world the unfair and evil treatment of workers and the sale of tainted meat. The purpose of the book was to force the government in creating laws and regulations that will bring safety to the American public. Upton Sinclair described the process of producing spoiled meat. In the novel, diseased cattle and hogs are processed for consumption, including pregnant cows and their fetuses. The sausages are made of a random mixture of animal parts, as well as the dirt, rat carcasses and poison scooped up off the floor. As a result, in 1907, a year after The Jungle was released; the government passed the Pure Food and Drug Act, including a Meat Inspection Act, so as to prevent the industries from selling tainted meat to the public. The workers at the m…