The Jacksonian Revolution by Robert V. Remini in the Portrait of America essay book
A New Generation of Political Leaders
The age of Jackson initiated a shocking overthrow of the noble republican standards of the founders by the common people. It was the people's turn to be heard and express themselves. In 1828, numerous Americans felt shock when they heard that Jackson was running for President. Jackson was regarded by some as a "rake" or a scoundrel. One lady even cried, "Well, if Jackson can be president, anybody can!" This was indeed true. The revolution started with an overthrow of the noble republican standards by the common people. The trite people voted for "a crude frontiersman" like Andrew Jackson. They chose him over a distinguished statesman of proven ability. The years of 1828 to 1848 were known as the Age of Jackson, or the Jacksonian era. The United States had experienced many profound changes, and the arrival of thousands of new voters was to change American politics forever. Previously, only the wealthy and better educated were involved in the government. There were no political parties, and they were highly unaccepted by both politicians and the general public. A new generation of politicians emerged who regarded political parties more favorably. Martin Van Buren emphasized the need for a two-party system in America. He formed an alliance with John C. Calhoun and many other southern politicians. They structured a political organization around the presidential candidate Andrew Jackson. This political organization became a political party – the Democratic Party. The Democrats followed the republican beliefs of Thomas Jefferson and opposed a strong central government and also a broad interpretation of the Constitution. They had an essentially conservative political policy. Their political philosophy advocated economy in operating the government. They also wanted to eliminate