The Inca of yesterday is the same modern Peru of today. Both the old and the new Inca/Peru hold the same two people dear to their hearts. Tupac Amaru, whose untimely death at the age of 28 left the accent Inca in silence, was an Incan revolutionary leader of the sixteenth century (Werlich, 41). Amaru is remembered by his Incan and Peruvian peoples alike as being the one who changed the political atmosphere and the morale of their people. Amaru's name has survived throughout five centuries as a symbol against injustice.
Amaru was born during the year of 1571, into a lineage that stemmed from a long line of royalty. Amaru was a direct descendent of Huayna Capac, who was the Eleventh emperor of the Inca empire. Amaru was also the fourth Vilcabamba emperor to rule.Vilcabamba was a region in the Inca Empire made up of mountains and jungle wilderness located north of Cuzco (Werlich, 47).Tupac was the legitimate son of Inca Yupanqui and being a legitimate son has great significance according to Incan Belief. The Incas believed only the legitimate children or the children of whose mother was loved more could rule. One text has his initial name as Amaru Tupac Inca.
Not much is written about the history of Tupac Amaru but what was kept record of mainly focuses on his birth and the details during his revolutionary responsibilities. What is clearly understood from that time of his rule is the immense wealth of love that was bestowed upon him by his Incan peoples. When Tupac Amaru was killed, the Conquistadors had his decapitated head mounted on a pole. The head of Tupac Amaru was supposed to strike fear in those Incans who plotted rebellious deeds.Quite to the contrary, the Incas did not fear the Spaniards nor saw Amaru's severe head as a sign of defeat. Rather the Incan people came out in masses to celebrate their leader (Stirling, 138). This made it known that the Incas would not be subdued quietly.Tupac Amaru l…