St Jerome’s letteremphasizes on using “Sense-for-sense” translation rather than “word-for-word”translation. He justified his method of translating sense-for-sense by listing examplesof Cicero, Horace, Hilary the Confessor and other Classical authors, as well asthe Evangelists and the Seventy Translator when translating from the sacredtexts. Since the charges by the Clergy against St Jerome was considered a hugeoffence back then, he mentioned these famous names in his letter. He alsoexplained the difficulties the translators face by mentioning that it is hardfor the translator to find the exact meaning, the equivalent rhetorical figuresand idioms of the original, in addition to the two languages which belong totwo different grammatical systems. On top of that, the meaning of a word had tobe explained by using few phrases in the other language, which would reduce thebeauty of the writing.

Here weunderstand that translation depends on time, space and culture. St Jerome throws light on the fact that people were makinga fuss about the syllables and were not focusing on the idea of preserving themeaning of the write-up, while translating. He wrote these lines to justifyhimself and clear the charges imposed on him by the clergy.

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At thisjuncture, St Jerome contradicts himself by supporting “word-for-word”translation. This contradiction is an unintentionally revelation of Jerome’strue stance in the strategy of Bible translation. We infer that Jeromeadopts a sense-for-sense strategy for Bible translation but to avoid beingin conflict with the churches,which might charge him of heresy (mentioned inpara 9) for altering the sense of Bible, he makes a cautious yetcontradictory statement St Jerome’s letter emphasizes onusing “Sense-for-sense” translation rather than “word-for-word” translation. Hejustified his method of translating sense-for-sense by listing examples ofCicero, Horace, Hilary the Confessor and other Classical authors, as well asthe Evangelists and the Seventy Translator when translating from the sacredtexts. Since the charges by the Clergy against St Jerome was considered a hugeoffence back then, he mentioned these famous names in his letter. He alsoexplained the difficulties the translators face by mentioning that it is hardfor the translator to find the exact meaning, the equivalent rhetorical figuresand idioms of the original, in addition to the two languages which belong totwo different grammatical systems. On top of that, the meaning of a word had tobe explained by using few phrases in the other language, which would reduce thebeauty of the writing.

Here weunderstand that translation depends on time, space and culture. St Jerome throws light on the fact that people were makinga fuss about the syllables and were not focusing on the idea of preserving themeaning of the write-up, while translating. He wrote these lines to justifyhimself and clear the charges imposed on him by the clergy.At this juncture, St Jerome contradicts himself bysupporting “word-for-word” translation. Thiscontradiction is an unintentionally revelation of Jerome’s true stance inthe strategy of Bible translation. We infer that Jerome adopts asense-for-sense strategy for Bible translation but to avoid being inconflict with the churches,which might charge him of heresy (mentioned inpara 9) for altering the sense of Bible, he makes a cautious yetcontradictory statementIn thisparagraph, he gave the examples of Plautus and Cæcilius and pointed out thatthey followed “Sense-for-sense” translation rather than “word-for-word” and howthey wanted to keep the meaning intact.

Moreover, St Jerome states one mustalways try to preserve the essence of the write-up, while translating.  St. Jerome’s purpose by quoting from hispreface to Eusebius’ Chronicle was to point out that there are differencesbetween languages in vocabulary, grammatical and syntactical constructions,idiom and style, which mean that word-for-word translation, would fail to beequivalent to the original. At the same time, he wanted to tell his controversiesthat from his adolescence he had always attempted to translate the sense notwords.

4 In considering a sentence fromMatthew with the Septuagint and Hebrew, St. Jerome found that the Evangelistgave a different sense to both of them: Behold a virgin, shall have inher womb and bear a son and they shall call his name Emmanuel (in Matthew) Behold a virgin shall receive inher womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Emmanuel (in theSeptuagint) Behold a virgin shall conceiveand bear a son, and she shall call his name Emmanuel (in the original Hebrew) St. Jerome explained that shallhave, shall receive, and shall conceive were not the same meaning. Such is thecase with they shall call his name Emmanuel, you shall call his name Emmanuel,and she shall call his name Emmanuel because it was the virgin herself whowould name him Emmanuel, not Ahaz nor the Jews.5In paragraph 11, St.Jerome talked about the Septuagint. He explained that there were noticeableomissions and additions in it to the degree that the Jews laughed at the Greekversion of a sentence in Isaiah like They (Jews) also ridiculed at the phrase in Amosfollowing the description of luxurious livingFor St.

Jerome, this wasa very rhetorical sentence worthy of Cicero himself. But, the question was  : He explainedthat the Christian indicated the omissions by marking them with an asterisk.Moreover, these omissions were visible on comparing his translation Version(Vulgate) and the original one. However, St Jerome made it clear that despitethe omissions and additions, the Septuagint ranked high in Christian churchesfor two reasonsSt. Jerome affirmed thatmany phrases, though beautiful in Greek, if translated literally they wouldsound awkward in Latin; and conversely, many phrases were pleasing in Latin,but if the word order remains unaltered, it would sound conflicting in Greek andwould displeased them.