In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird, a mockingbird is a symbol of innocence. The quote, “It is a sin to kill a mockingbird” comes up many times in the novel. They say it is a sin to kill a mockingbird because if you kill a mockingbird, you are killing the innocence it is beholding. The novel symbolizes multiple people as mockingbirds. For example, Tom Robinson is portrayed as a mockingbird because he has done nothing wrong. He has his innocence killed when Mayella Ewell accuses him of rape and when he gets shot seventeen times. Another example of a mockingbird is Mayella Ewell. Although she falsely accuses Tom Robinson of raping her, all she wanted was attention. After her mother’s passing and her dad being an alcoholic, Mayella is forced to look after her seven siblings. When she is caught with him, she has no choice but to testify against him. Therefore, Mayella has done nothing wrong except want attention. Her innocence in killed when her father beats and rapes her. The theme of tolerance is your ability to understand people’s differences and be tolerant to their opinions even if you may not agree, which is portrayed greatly by Atticus. One example is when Bob Ewell threatens Atticus then spits in his face. Atticus is truly tolerant to this because he simply responded by wiping his face off and leaving the situation. Another example is when Dolphus Raymond tells Dill why he pretends to be an alcoholic which proves his tolerance of the opinionated people. When he says, “Cry about the hell white people give colored folks without even stopping to think they’re people, too” it exemplifies the fact that he doesn’t agree with the people’s opinions but minds his own business. Friendship is a close bond shared between two people. A friendship between Scout, Jem, and Boo wasn’t pointed out until the end of the novel, but in certain instances there were hints of acknowledgment and amity. An example is when Scout and Jem walk past the Radley tree over many days and find many unique items. Eventually, the readers find out that the items were placed there secretly by Boo for Jem and Scout. For Boo, acknowledgement is a big thing he cares about. He was very alone and when Jem and Scout were intrigued by him, it gave Boo hope, hope of a friendship. Throughout the novel, Scout also has an unbreakable bond with Dill. An example of this is after Atticus allows Dill to stay the night when he ran away from home, he sneaks into Scout’s room and sits with her. They then have youthful conversation about their futures not only as individuals, but together. This shows how much DIll cares about Scout and values their friendship because he knows that he wants her in his life forever at such a young age.