A lot of students fly back to their home town to pursue their higher education maybe because you get engineering or a doctor’s degree for a lot cheaper cost. I too moved to Karachi from Dubai to pursue my higher studies but in midst of this journey I was faced with so many harsh realities of our current education system. I was much more fortunate than so many of the students in my class because I received my primary and secondary education at some of the fine institutions in Dubai and thus had a firm ground in many of the subjects I had opted for in the first semester. Most of my course content was merely a revision of what I was taught during my A level years. The difference in the quality and standard of education between these two cities was strikingly clear to me now that I have studied in both the places. That is when I came to realize that our education system in Pakistan is inherently flawed and a lot needs to be done to change it. Our institutions are more focused on getting good grades without enforcing any real thinking in classrooms. Our current education system places too much of emphasis on A and not much emphasis on unleashing the potential that lies inside each and every one of us. We are constantly given the message that good grades determine success and if you are not one of those high achievers than you will certainly not ever contribute anything to this world. As a result millions of students with incredible potential are left to die (educationally speaking) not realizing their true potential. This clearly defeats the whole purpose of education. Education is meant to build, not destroy. Our education system miserably fails to engage our students into thinking out of the boxes, questioning, curiosity, exploring new horizons. Here, in Pakistan education is merely the name of memorizing lessons. Hence, we students have adopted a mindset to survive by memorizing all of the teacher’s lectures because everything on the exam paper is going to be from it. Any student with good memory who master-rote learning everything from the lessons would get high scores but lack in everything other than scoring the so-called aces in the exams. While the world is integrating new technology in every walk of life, we are still stuck in the 19th century era with our syllabus and course outlines utterly outdated. How can we raise the leaders of our future with resources that have been out of order for a long time now, with textbooks that are centuries old?  Another major reason for the degradation of our education system is that our teachers are not sincere to their job. A lot of our teachers are unqualified with minimal understanding of the subjects; those who are qualified are more concerned about making a profit than about educating our nation. So many teachers that I had during my first semester would not attend classes regularly and those who did would end class way sooner than its actual end-time. In our physics lab we had devices and electronics that were centuries old and so few in number that every student wouldn’t get to test the devices. We would have to shadow our lab teacher. Our teacher was so vague, would just babble anything with so much confidence knowing too well that his students didn’t know a lot to test the authenticity of his explanation and even if they did they wouldn’t dare to question him out of fear of being insulted in front of the class. Such failed education system, miserable mentors, and old fashioned lessons would only produce copy-cats and followers, not leaders and innovators. Our education system is missing on the real sense of educating students. Education is not rote memorization and analyzing books that have no meaning to you but instead it is about unleashing one’s confidence, learning from failures.  It is obvious that our current education system need some serious reforms so that our children are able to accomplish incredible things outside those classrooms too.